H&Amp;M Nước Nào Rẻ Nhất

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Lots of British English speakers never pronounce /h/, others pronounce it sometimes, but nobody toàn thân pronounces it all the time, in other words, it’s a grey area.

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So what is H? When is it silent? Is the letter ‘Haitch’ or ‘Aitch‘? Oh, & bởi vì we really need it, onestly?

/h/

If you’re going to lớn pronounce H, imagine you are steaming up a mirror /h/. It’s a voiceless fricative sầu in the throat, it isn’t made in the mouth /x/ or on the lips /ɸ/. Altogether now: “Harry has hairy hands”.

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Silent H

H is always silent in HONOUR, HOUR, HONEST, HEIR, VEHICLE & VEHEMENT. You don’t say it after ‘g’ in GHOST, GHASTLY, AGHAST, GHERKIN & GHETTO, or after ‘r’ in RHINOCEROS, RHUBARB, RHYME & RHYTHM. It’s normally silent after ‘w’: WHAT? WHICH? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? but it’s pronounced in WHO? – “Who’d have thought it?”. And we don’t always say it after ‘ex’ – which is either EXHILARATING… or EXHAUSTING.

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Weak H

The weak function words: HE, HIM, HIS, HER, HAVE, HAD và HAS all tkết thúc to lớn chiến bại the H if the word doesn’t appear at the beginning. So say H in “He’s ok”, but not in “Is he really?”. Pronounce it in “Have you finished”, but not in “You must have done”. 

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H Droppers

Many British English speakers never, ever say /h/; so they pronounce ‘hill’ & ‘ill’ identically – /ɪl/. These speakers are known as ‘H Droppers’ & it’s a clear feature of most regional British accents – London included, altogether now: “Harry has hairy hands”. 

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a/an + H

The rule goes that the article ‘a’ is used before a consonant & ‘an’ is used before a vowel, so with silent H we would say “an honest” and with pronounced H we would say “a hotel”. But some posher speakers tkết thúc to lớn treat a pronounced H as if it were not there, so they would say “an historic” and “an hotel”. H droppers tend khổng lồ always use ‘an’, so cockneys would say “Give us an (h)and” and “She’s renting an (h)ouse”.

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HAITCH or AITCH?

The pronunciation of the letter itself is unclear, should it be /heɪtʃ/ or /eɪtʃ/? The standard or ‘correct’ version in GB is /eɪtʃ/, và this is the pronunciation the BBC recommends to lớn its broadcasters as being “less likely lớn attract audience complaints.” The reality is that both pronunciations are commonly used & some native sầu speakers will switch between both.

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TH, GH, SH, PH

The sound /h/ is always spelt with an H. But that’s not the only time we see it in English. It combines with ’t’ to lớn make the two dental fricatives /θ/ in THINK & /ð/ in THIS. It combines with ’s’ lớn make /ʃ/ in SHAME, POSH và FASHION, & with c to make /tʃ/ in CHIMNEY và WATCH. ‘ph’ is normally pronounced /f/ like in PHENOMENAL & ELEPHANT, but not in SHEPHERD. Sometimes ‘gh’ is also /f/ at the end of a syllable ENOUGH! but it’s more likely to be silent – WEIGH, THIGH, THROUGH, THOROUGH và BOROUGH. Oh and let’s not forget the /p/ in HICCOUGH.

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American vs British

Some famous differences between GB English and its American counterpart involve H. In GB we have sầu SCHEDULES with a /ʃ/, but in America they are /ˈskedʒəlz/. GB cooks lượt thích the H in HERBS, whereas they prefer /ˈɜːrbz/ across the pond. 

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Do we really need /h/?

Most Latin based languages have got rid of /h/ – you won’t find one in Spanish, French or Italian khổng lồ name a few, & there has been an ongoing debate for centuries as khổng lồ whether we need the sound at all in English. When you consider words like ‘hospital’ dropped their /h/ lớn /ˈɒspɪtəl/, then got it baông xã again, & the fact it simply doesn’t exist in most regional accents, you may wonder whether /h/ is just a fashion accessory bandied around by elocutionists elusively seeking ‘correctness’. 

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